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the taliban out of their holds. today, most major cities and most afghans are more secure than insurgents have continued to lose territory. meanwhile, afghan forces continue to grow stronger. as planned, some 352,000 afghan soldiers and police are now in training or on duty. most missions are already being led by afghan forces. and of all the men and women in uniform in afghanistan, the vast majority are afghans who are fighting and dying for their country every day. we still face significant challenges. but because this progress, our transition is on track. at the n.a.t.o. summit last year, we agreed with our coalition partners that after beg afghan forces in 2013. the president has been here and we've consulted with coalition partners and continue to do so. today we agreed that as afghan forces take the lead and as president karzai announces the final phase of the transition, coalitions forces will move to a support role this spring. our troops will continue to fight alongside afghan forces as needed, but starting this spring our troops will have a different mission, training, advising, assi
afghanistan to launch attacks against our country. at the same time, we pushed the taliban out of their strongholds. today, most major cities and most afghans are more secure and insurgents continue to lose territory. afghan forces continue to grow stronger, meanwhile. as planned, some 352,000 afghan soldiers and police are now in training or on duty. most missions are already being led by afghan forces. of all the men and women in uniform in afghanistan, the vast majority are afghans who are fighting and dying for their country every day. we still face significant challenges, but because this progress our transition is on track. last year we agreed with partners that afghan forces will take the lead for security in mid 2013. president karzai and his team have been here for several days, we have consulted with our coalition partners, and we will continue to do so, and today we agreed that as afghan forces take the lead and as president karzai announces the final phase of the transition, coalition forces will move to a support role this spring. our troops will continue to fight
: there is another headline out of this too, jennifer, that's talks with the taliban. >> after 11 years of war, the afghan president announced today from the white house the taliban will be given a seat at the table. >> we agreed on allowing the taliban office in qatar. >> president obama issued a caveat. the taliban must renounce terrorism. the president diverted attention from those asking whether 11 years of war were worth it by announcing today army staff sergeant clinton romesha who helped repel one of the most vicious attacks in eastern afghanistan in 2009 would receive the medal of honor, shepard. >> shepard: first you kill the taliban and then you have him in for talks. fascinating. 2013. jen griffin at the pentagon. thanks. john boehner formally invited the president to deliver his first state of the union of his second term the date february 12th. he has to be invited, you know. the president hats accepted the date which also happens to be abraham lincoln's birthday it will touch on immigration reform spending and gun control. in a letter to the president speaker boehner wrote our na
troops would weaken the negotiating position about those negotiations with the taliban ever got started again. now, the taliban, that's been one of their demands. all u.s. troops leave afghanistan after 2014. and there are some who feel the white house 234r0floated this io sort of, you know, lay the ground work to get some perhaps concessions on some other issues that are important to the white house. in other words, more of a negotiati negotiati negotiating ploy. >> it's been a tense relationship on many occasions. be interesting to know how this meeting goes in that regard. also he's the guy they have to deal with. he's the only player they really can deal with. but the reality is he still doesn't run much of afghanistan in the real world environment. and the lingering allegations of corruption, nepotism, hangs over his head. >> his brother and father were assassinated, so in some ways he's also trying to stay alive in that country. and facing that possibility, as well. it's been a contentious relationship with karzai over the years. he's had better relationships with some of the gene
the taliban and has been if that is a friend who needs an enemy kind and a half. today the white house to talk about our nation's longest war. specifically when and how we will get out of there finally. that is the question from many afghans. but the president of afghanistan wants to talk about the circumstances. so they will and we will report in just a moment. this s "studio b." and a choice. take tylenol or take aleve, the #1 recommended pain reliever by orthopedic doctors. just two aleve can keep pain away all day. back to the news. >> shepard: the former governor of new mexico bill richardson is back in the united states after he made a trip to north korea with the google chairman eric schmidt. the state department criticized the visit as unhelpful and basically told they don't go but they went anyway. they pushed nort north north kp missile launches and nuclear tests and called on the regime to allow more cell phones and internet access. he also said he asked for fair and humane treatment for an american citizen detained in north korea. he joins us now. also the former energy secretary a
billion for them to be due to by the taliban. we will see a dramatic increase -- a decrease of american dollars and soldiers being sent to afghanistan over the next several years. $4,000,000,000.5000000000 dollars for them to continue to host: but you said earlier that aid will continue for at least 10 years. guest: i hope and expect that it will continue for the next 10 years. we should probably talk about where that is a good idea. afghanistan and pakistan, that nexus, the tribal border region there that is poorly defined and poured a controlled is perhaps the most dangerous place in the world to the united states. it is where al qaeda and began. it is where the remnants of al qaeda still exists. there was a draw on strike reported within the last 24 hours against terrorists in that region. babalu remain a threat in that area for the force -- that is an area that will remain a threat for the foreseeable future. we can conduct drones strikes, gather intelligence, continue to keep an eye on that area, stabilize it and influence the direction it goes, because that is the part of the worl
the taliban renouncing terrorism, without them recognizing the afghan constitution, and recognizing that if there are changes they want to make to how the afghan government operates, then there is an orderly constitutional process to do that, and that you cannot resort to violence. the afghan constitution protects the rights of afghan women. and the united states strongly believes that afghanistan cannot succeed unless it gives opportunity to its women. we believe that a about 3 -- we believe that about every country in the world. we will continue to voice very strongly support for the afghan constitution as protection for minorities, its protection of women, and we think that a failure to provide that protection not only will make reconciliation impossible to achieve, but also would make afghanistan's long term development impossible to achieve. the single best indicator or one of the single best indicators of a country's prosperity around the world is how does it treats its women. does it educate that half of the population? does it give an opportunity? when it does, you will poli
by the taliban, shot in the head three months ago because she spoke out for education for girls. she and her family will stay in england. the taliban and pakistan has vowed to target malala again and she still has another round of surgery next month. still ahead here on "world news," the new video that takes you inside the mind of a drug user, to show what it's like to be on a popular drug. and why the us navy is sounding the warning. [ female announcer ] today, jason is here to volunteer to help those in need. when a twinge of back pain surprises him. morning starts in high spirits, but there's a growing pain in his lower back. as lines grow longer, his pain continues to linger. but after a long day of helping others, he gets some helpful advice. just two aleve have the strength to keep back pain away all day. today, jason chose aleve. just two pills for all day pain relief. try aleve d for strong, all day long sinus and headache relief. then i read an article about a study that looked at the long term health benefits of taking multivitamins. they used centrum silver for the study... so i g
to by the taliban. we will see a dramatic decrease of american dollars and soldiers being sent to afghanistan over the next several years. host: but you said earlier that aid will continue for at least 10 years. guest: i hope and expect that it will continue for the next 10 years. we should probably talk about where that is a good idea. the fact is, afghanistan and pakistan, that nexus, the tribal border region there that is poorly defined and poured a controlled is perhaps the most dangerous place in the world to the united states. it is where al qaeda and began. it is where the remnants of al qaeda still exists. there was a drone strike reported within the last 24 hours against terrorists in that region. that is an area that will remain a threat for the foreseeable future. we can conduct drones strikes, gather intelligence, continue to keep an eye on that area, stabilize it and influence the direction it goes, because that is the part of the world that puts the united states most at risk. host: a sovereignty issue for pakistan, but also, karzai is expected to bring up sovereignty issues for afgh
immaturity of afghan forces alongside the continuing presence of the taliban, isn't it in our interest to walk slowly out of this conflict rather than too quickly? >> well, it may be in our national security interest to do that, martin, but there's been a great deal of anticipation that this conflict was coming to an end. we saw during the presidential campaign that they d republicans tried to make a big deal of squabbling over the details but they, too, were seeing a fairly rapid end to this, and this expedites it somewhat more quickly. so i think there's going to be a lot of crossing of fingers and hoping things don't turn into an even worse disaster there. but this had already been baked in the cake. there's no political will to stay any further. >> okay. mike, i followed much of what you have written on the subject of afghanistan, and it seems as though you feel a little more optimistic about the country. but given the endemic corruption, the harboring of pakistani terrorists along the border, the confused way that nato has pumped money into afghanistan, do we leave a nation that r
with the taliban? that could actually produce a formal end to the war, our departure really can't. jenna: if you would, michael, because the last time you were in afghanistan i remember reading some of your notes from that trip. you said at that time you said the taliban are not winning now, but that that could change, and so when we're looking at a war and finishing it and who won and who lost if the taliban are negotiated with is that a win for us? is it a win for the american people and our security? >> i think our core security goal is to make sure that the government in afghanistan is in control of its own territory to the point where terrorists sanctuaries cannot spring up again. that is the core american national security goal. we'd like to be able to also keep an eye on pakistan's western provincess from that area as well and continue some of the operations that as you know we've been conducting from afghanistan to go after terrorists there too. those are our core interests. everything else is in the category of nice to v. unfortunately you can't necessarily go after a terrorist unless y
the pakistani school girl who was shot in the head by the taliban for advocating education for girls? well, she's making a remarkable recovery. malala yousafzai was flown to britain for treatment in october. today she was able to walk out of the hospital. malala, who's 15 years old, faces more surgery next month. for now, she'll be staying in britain with her family. gun owners in new york are outraged after a newspaper publishes their addresses. we'll have a look at the 29 states where the flu is the worst. and we'll tell you what happened to a chicago jail escape artist who climbed down 20 stories worth of bed sheets when the "cbs evening news" continues. i've always had to keep my eye on her... but, i didn't always watch out for myself. with so much noise about health care... i tuned it all out. with unitedhealthcare, i get information that matters... my individual health profile. not random statistics. they even reward me for addressing my health risks. so i'm doing fine... but she's still going to give me a heart attack. we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million am
in response to gun violence. >>> the pakistani education crusader shot in the head by the taliban is now out of a british hospital. she was released yesterday. the teen will continue undergoing rehabilitation in the u.k. >>> google's ceo is visiting an unlikely place, north korea, a place that keeps a welded lid on technology information. bill richardson has been there several times. it's being called a private humanitarian visit, and it's not on behalf of the obama administration. sources say governor richardson could try to negotiate the release of an american prisoner who was captured there last month. >>> all right, the fiscal cliff, hill, slope, time bomb, whatever you want to call it, aren't you glad to be over the metaphor madness about what this thing is? >> kick the can down the road. >> it's just kicking the can down the road. >> kicking the can. >> we are done with kicking this can down the road. >> oh, yeah. the fiscal cliff turned into a can. too bad those metaphors aren't gone with the fiscal cliff. that's next. over the south pacific in 1943. i got mine in iraq, 2003. usaa aut
, continuing to provide advisorses. in other words, give them the tools to fight the taliban. i think that in fact they're going to be motivated, partly because the taliban are going to behave so badly like they did before that we will find afghans win to fight them. it might not necessarily be president karzai, but there will be afghan actors who will fight the taliban. >>brian: you say one of the things the soviets did wrong, the soviet union collapsed, gorbachev takes over, and the reason why what the afghans left collapsed is because the soviets cut them off. >> gorbachev continued to arm them. it was yeltsin. as soon as yeltsin took over at our behest, he took overt marxist regime and within months it fell. >>brian: you look at egypt and iraq, you've been to iraq when saddam was in power in afghanistan, and you say wait, when we pull out, they'll realize we are best friend they could possibly have. >> i think what they're going to find is their problems aren't over. in other words, they've got an awful lot of enemies in that part of the world. everyone hates each other more than
'd love to see them. >> alisyn: and shot down by the taliban for standing up to women and girl's rights. she just got out of the hospital, and again. >> tucker: and justin bieber caught smoking pot. >> not the biebs. ♪ initiated. neural speeds increasing to 4g lte. brain upgrading to a quad-core processor. predictive intelligence with google now complete. introducing droid dna by htc. it's not an upgrade to your phone. it's an upgrade to yourself. >> and welcome back, quick sports headlines for you this morning. nfl wild card weekend underway with a strong bang yesterday. i hope you watched these games, strong packers defense made quick work of minnesota, 24-10. they play they play san francisco next week and foster led the victory over cincinnati, 19-13 and houston faces a tough battle against new england next weekend, ali. >> thank you. 15-year-old malala yousufzai, a symbol of courage after being shot in the head by the taliban. and this week released from a british hospital. will malala live a normal live or carry on her mission or return to pakistan? joining us now is the presid
at the "morning papers." "the washington post." the cia has started off 2013 by using drones to bomb taliban targets in pakistan on 7 of the last 10 days. analysts say the uptick in air attacks is a move to weaken the taliban's hold on the region ahead of coalition troop withdrawals in 2014. >>> and "the washington post," the pentagon is preparing for a worst-case scenario in which lawmakers failed to make its march 1st deadline on the budget deal. that would mean deep, across-the-board cuts including $500 million less for the defense department. leon panetta says it would be a huge setback for national security. >>> "the wall street journal," american express is set to cut 5,400 jobs. the company will slash 8.5% of its staff, mostly from its travel division which has lost business in the advent of internet travel sites. >>> this weekend's "parade" magazine, it's the savings issue. inside, a guide to saving $10,000 this year. >> did you hear that? you can save money. >> that's a good investment because that "parade" doesn't cost that much. so you can save. that's kind of a no-brainer. >> the
. this is some of the problems we have seen. it did not want to narrowly cover just the al qaeda and taliban but could be expanded for whoever the president decides is the enemy. it's troubling. we would be put in a position that we can argue we've reached the end. the last 11 years have shown there's a lot of institutional push for this war to be over with. >> the gentleman over here. >> i'm from the german embassy. my name is joseph. i have a question that may be hypothetical. what would happen if president obama would decide tomorrow to close down guantanamo. he as commander-in-chief, if he would do this, what would happen? could congress or anyone block it? if you make this decision tomorrow, what would happen? >> well, there are practical problems now with where the people can go. so it takes work to get it so you can empty the people out of guantanamo. you really need to open it up so people can come to the united states, certain ones of them, and make it easier for them to go to a third country. -it is a. light- and i go back to lincoln. lincoln could not just say i'm not going to all
's attention because many fear if there are no u.s. troops the country will revert to the taliban you have provided options not to the president yet but to the national security staff. as you know i don't speak about options until i have had a chance to speak to the president. >> at the state department president karzai is dining tonight with secretary clinton and leon panetta. he brought a long list of military equipment that karzai needs from kabul but which what is is increasingly clear whatever u.s. presence there will be in afghanistan after 2014 will be quite small, shepard. >> jenks then there is israel. the israeli defense minister in town in washington and talking about concerns of serious chemical weapons amid that civil war. >> it's interesting, the last time that ehud barak the defense minister was in town in washington at the end the of last year. we started hearing reports that there was new intelligence suggesting that sara ran gas had been mixed and maybe even loaded into weapons inside syria. just two days ago we heard the "new york times" report that that intelligence cam
that are the taliban and al qaeda. we have an unreliable ally in president karzai, he is erratic and this will cause him to be even more erratic and our own ally will be looking at us and saying, no, where is the united states going. no, judy, i think this was a highly injudicious statement. >> celeste ward gventer, an injudicious statement and bad idea? >> well i have the greatest respect for bing west and i'm honored to be on the show with him but i respectfully disagree. for us to be talking about troop levels right now putting the cart before the horse in any case. because frankly we should be talking about our vision for the region strategically. in any event we still need consider that having no troops there is a real option, and i think to ignore that option would be strategically foolish. we heard about the supposed apandora's box lips that was coming if u.s. troops left iraq. u.s. troops left iraq and the apocalypse has not arrive. that is an option for us and it would be irresponsible for us not to consider it. >> bing west, what is the argument for keeping a significant contingent of troo
of the soldiers and taliban, they are ready for a withdrawal because they feel if the withdrawal happens, there will be less fighting. but many analysts say the fighting will continue. >> on a side note, real interesting, before we let you go, we don't get much face time with atia, we were talking about movies coming to afghanistan, zero dark thirty, whether it was seen there yet. girls going back to school. here in america we think all children need to be educated. women can't go to the movie theater in afghanistan. >> no, they can't. if they try to it would be a dangerous prospect. the men that go to the movie theaters, we have to remember afghanistan doesn't have a class that have jobs, many boys are going there and causing troubles. girls cannot go and bear by go out by themselves without being harassed. massive sexual harass. me ment on the streets. there are children providing for their families and treated pretty badly. >> we need to continue talking about this. thanks for being here. great to see you. as we mentioned president obama and president karzai will hold a joint news con
our country. at the same time, we pushed the taliban out of their strongholds. today, most major cities and afghans are more security and insurgents have continued to lose territory. meanwhile, afghan forces continue to grow stronger. as planned, some 352,000 afghan soldiers and police are now in training or are on duty. most missions are already being led by afghan forces. and of all the men and women in uniform in afghanistan, the vast majority are afghans who are fighting and dying for their country everyday. we still face significant challenges, but because of this progress, our transition is on track. at the nato summit last year wing a e greed with the coalition forces that afghan forces will take the lead for security in mid-2013. president karzai and the team have been here for several days, and we have shared a vision of how to move ahead and consulted with our coalition partners, and we will continue to do so, and today, with we agreed as afghan forces take the lead, and as president karzai announces the final phase of the transition, coalition forces will move to a sup
that border, clean out those safe havens from the taliban go, refuel and come back to fight again, and the third stool, the third leg of that stool is the karzai government. he's a corrupt and incompetent leader, has failed to motivate his people and hold his country today. bill: with regard to karzai does he want us to leave or does he think his country can survive without us there? >> the yes is does karzai think he can survive without us there. karzai, i think has an exit strategy planned. how long is he going to survive if this is country is torn apart in a multi-part tee civil war? will his military remain faithful to him in the light of pashtoon taliban coming in. his military is phaeupd of different tribes. will they stay loyal and be effective? i think the problem everybody for sees and you can see it coming, that when we leave afghanistan a lot of things will happen. our military leaves. our ability to protect the civilian population that we are leaving behind, including our own civilian ngo aid workers, and then the final thing is will they be able to hold that country t
not going to work backward from what has been accomplished. we have seriously weakened the taliban. you know, the two remain resilient. we know they're still out there, but we've been able to take the battle to the taliban and prevent them from getting any territory they lost and we're continuing to do that. we are seeing a ansf and afghan military that is increasingly important its ability to be operational. we've gone through a transition areas and above of a 75% of the population of afghanistan and those transitions are working, moving in the right direction and it is the ansf providing the security with regards to all of these areas. in addition to that, we have and removing the fourth tranche in next year will implement the final tranche in this transition. so progress is being made. progress is being made on the battlefield. progress is being made with regards to the society in afghanistan. the house arab afghans is improving. is it everything we want? note. is it everything that we would hope they would be able to achieve in this timeframe? not yet. but we are moving in the right dire
activist. in an attack that sparked global outrage, she was targeted in pakistan by taliban gunmen for speaking out in favor of education for pakistani girls. now, three months later, she's been discharged from a british hospital recovering in england. doctors plan to perform more surgery on her within the next month. we wish her well. up next, we dive into the vault not once but twice. which president began the era of helping the people and which one screwed it all up? r on may 18th, five days later, i had a massive heart attack. bayer aspirin was the first thing the emts gave me. now, i'm on a bayer aspirin regimen. [ male announcer ] be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen. [ woman ] learn from my story. [ male announcer ] how do you make 70,000 trades a second... ♪ reach one customer at a time? ♪ or help doctors turn billions of bytes of shared information... ♪ into a fifth anniversary of remission? ♪ whatever your business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. this reduced sodium soup says it may help lower cho
and taliban and associated forces so that not only -- >> associated doing a lot of work there? >> it is. and the other thing that's doing a lot of work is substantially supported. anybody who substantially supported these forces is subject to indefinite detention which is not something that you would get if you went back and read the authorization for use and military force from 2001, which describes a narrower set of people, frankly. >> so we've actually expanded? >> legislatively, yes. in some ways, this bill was basically codifying what the lower courts have been doing. >> have allowed. >> have alouds. >> the supreme court hadn't weighed in on whether this is okay. will it? i don't know. >> let me ask you this, ben, the naacp is not an institution that's focused on national security issues, for understandable reasons but i wonder sometimes and i'm not someone that welcome i don't myself, that's not the thing i spend most of my time reading about but i wonder if when you think about this stuff, the role of an organization like naacp to weigh in on this stuff partly because of the hist
made. we're not going to walk backward from what has been accomplished. we have weakened the taliban. they do remain resilient. we know they are still out there. but we have been able to take the battle to the taliban and prevent them from gaining an -- territory they lost. we are in seeing the afghan military that is improving its ability to be operational. we have now gone through a transition of areas that involve 75% of the population of afghanistan. those transitions are moving in the right direction. and they are providing the primary security with regard to all those areas. in addition to that, we have our and we are moving the fourth tranche and next year we will implement the final one in this transition. progress is being made. progress is being made on the battlefield, with regard to the society in afghanistan, the education and health care of afghans in it -- is improving. is it everything we want? now. is it everything we would hope it would be able to achieve? not yet. but we are moving in the right direction. i think we really have the opportunity to be able to put thi
to be a resurgence and outbreak of violence in a place that's already plagued by it. the taliban this weekend vowed more of what it called war destruction if the u.s. leaves behind a residual force. that's a sobering reminder of the instability here, alex. >> i appreciate the breakdown of the numbers and what they would be doing. >>> the new headline this morning, the white house considering a broad gun control plan. i'm going to speak with civil rights activist reverend jesse jackson about it next. later nbc news presidential historian michael beschloss on whether the debt ceiling could be a legacy trap. mine was earned off vietnam in 1968. over the south pacific in 1943. i got mine in iraq, 2003. usaa auto insurance is often handed down from generation to generation. because it offers a superior level of protection, and because usaa's commitment to serve the military, veterans and their families is without equal. begin your legacy, get an auto insurance quote. usaa. we know what it means to serve. starts with arthritis pain and a choice. take tylenol or take aleve, the #1 recommended pain relieve
they have a government that's not taliban and al-qaeda free? how much does it mean to you and those who lost their lives? >> it means a lot to me. the afghan people made a lot of progress. if go back from 1979, really until the present, they've been at war. the country has been torn apart. in the last few years, they have made progress, more rights for women, more kids in schools, economic progress and a lot of different things. they don't want to lose that. to me, it's very important for our moral responsibility to the afghan people, but also for our geostrategic interest in the region. i don't necessarily think that means thousands of american troops there. i do think that it means a strategic partnership to secure in the minds of afghan people that they've got a friend. >> steve: we want to talk to you on the other side of a quick timeout about saddam hussein because there is some stuff that you can clarify for us. so the general is sticking around. more on his great new book "my share of the task" coming up. >> brian: let's check in with bill hemmer to find out what's coming up at the to
, that the afghan forces will not hang on to, sell it to, or have it capturedded from them by the taliban, and is it being a risk that what mite up in the hands of the haqqani network or potentially al al-qaa related groups? >> well, the defense secretary gave some information to the house in november about plans on this. he said the intense is to extract all equipment whose value to the arms forces is an extraction and recooperation. reallily, that is, you would expect that to include or have sophisticated equipment, but if we hope we do the southern route, pakistan, but we are negotiating northern rotes in kazakhstan and russia, but we can also bring equipment out by air, and as things stand now r there are no firm plans to leave equipment behind. there is no decisions to leave behind equipment x in afghanistan. if we do that, all relevant issues have to be looked at, but i think we should. if left to the afghan courses, we regard it in the same way. >> will export lines have to be issued for goods that are gifted, and will there be a need of approval for any such equipment? >> there's
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)